Breadcrumb

Overview of Non-Recognized Organizations

Four smilng students, wearing UCR t-shirts, walk along a tree-lined path of the UCR campus.
 

If you’re a student at UCR and looking for ways to get involved, joining one of our ~500 student organizations is a great choice. However, not every organization you talk to may be registered with our office, and that means there are likely risks involved with joining.

The following sections outline why you should be on the lookout for non-recognized groups and why you shouldn’t join one. If you’re curious about an organization, refer to HighlanderLink  — it lists only active organization recognized by UCR.

List of Non-Recognized Organizations

Non-recognized groups like the ones listed below have no relationship with the university. Students, departments, sports clubs, registered student organizations, and other organizations should avoid joining or collaborating with any of the groups listed below. They do not receive any oversight or liability coverage from the university and are not held accountable at the local, regional, or national level.

Students, organizations, and campus departments who interact or seek affiliation with these organizations do so at their own risk. Joining dismissed organizations and/or participating in activities of dismissed organizations perceived to be official activities of dismissed organizations is considered a policy violation and could result in suspension or dismissal from the university.

Please visit the Councils and Chapters page for a list of recognized fraternities and sororities. You can also contact the Fraternity and Sorority Involvement Center (FSIC) if you come into contact with, or have questions about, non-recognized fraternities or sororities, including those groups listed below.

Suspended Organizations

  • Alpha Phi Alpha (AΦA) Fraternity was placed on interim suspension in September 2018 as a result of risk management concerns. This status is pending investigation. If allegations are unfounded, organization status will be updated.
  • Beta Phi Delta This co-ed community service fraternity was placed on interim suspension in October 2019 as a result of risk management concerns. This status is pending investigation. If allegations are unfounded, organization status will be updated.

Dismissed Organizations

 
  • Alpha Kappa Delta Phi (aKΔΦ) Sorority was dismissed by UCR in 2013 as a result of hazing.
  • Alpha Sigma Omicron (AΣO) Co-ed pre-health fraternity was dismissed by UCR in 2017 as a result of hazing.
  • Beta Chi Theta (BCq) Fraternity was dismissed by UCR in 2017 as a result of risk management violations and failure to comply with university sanctions.
  • Beta Upsilon Delta (BUD) Fraternity was dismissed by UCR in 2018 as a result of risk management violations and failure to comply with university sanctions.
  • Phi Gamma Delta (FIJI) Fraternity was suspended by its national headquarters in September 2019 as a result of risk management violations, including hazing.
  • Pi Delta Psi (ΠΔY) Fraternity was dismissed by UCR in October 2019 as a result of failure to comply with university sanctions.
  • Pi Alpha Phi (ΠΑΦ) Fraternity, also known as "Pineapples," was dismissed by UCR in 2012 as a result of hazing and failure to comply with university sanctions.
  • Pi Kappa Alpha (ΠΚΑ) Fraternity, also known as "PIKE," was suspended by its national headquarters and dismissed by UCR in 2016 as a result of risk management violations and failure to comply with university sanctions.
  • Rho Delta Chi (RΔC) Sorority was dismissed by UCR in September 2019 as a result of risk management violations, including hazing.

Unrecognized Organizations

  • Kappa Sigma (KΣ) Fraternity began activity in Riverside in 2011 but is not recognized by the university.

On-Campus Resources:

  • UCPD: (951) 827-5222
  • Student Conduct: (951) 827-4208 or online.
  • Dean of Students, Dr. Christine Mata: (951) 827-6095, christine.mata@ucr.edu
  • Interim Assistant Director of Student Life, Carly Garcia: (951) 827-3826, carly.garcia@ucr.edu
  • Fraternity and Sorority Advisor, Nayaab Kazmi: (951) 827-2068, nayaab.kazmi@ucr.edu
  • FSIC: (951) 827-2438 or fsic@ucr.edu
  • Senior Associate Athletics Director for External Relations, Wesley Mallette: wesley.mallette@ucr.edu
  • If you live on-campus, you can talk to your Resident Advisor (RA).

 

Information and Resources on Hazing

For organizations listed here, you may see some of them have been removed from campus for hazing violations. We want to make sure you understand what hazing means and what to do if you see this type of behavior. Unfortunately, hazing is a challenge for many campuses and UCR is not alone in the struggle against hazing. This type of misconduct threatens the health and safety of our students. Such activities are not tolerated and must stop on our campus.

Hazing is defined as:
Any method of initiation or pre-initiation into a campus organization or other activity engaged in by the organization or members of the organization at any time that causes, or is likely to cause, physical injury or personal degradation or disgrace resulting in psychological harm to any student or other person.
Hazing information and UC policy.

Unfortunately, hazing takes place in all sorts of groups and organizations. Hazing is not just defined by a list of behaviors or activities; it is often focused on creating and emphasizing specific power dynamics within a group. It is common for people who experience hazing not to think of the incidents as hazing, which often perpetuates a cycle of hazing. Even if individuals appear to “agree” to be hazed, it does not excuse the behavior. This is where we ask all students to do their part to step up in any situation where you observe or hear about hazing to prevent potential harm to those involved.

We encourage all students to take action in any situations where they feel individuals may be at risk. If you have heard of or seen any activity that may put students at risk, you can report it to UCPD, Student Conduct, the Fraternity and Sorority Involvement Center, Student Life, Athletics, Residential Life or the Dean of Students. Encourage all members to engage in safe and healthy behaviors and to look out for one another.

Hazing prevention is also about promoting activities that are alternatives to hazing. We encourage organizations to develop group bonds and unity through healthy and sustainable activities that create a sense of belonging and have a positive impact. Groups committed to finding alternatives to hazing can contact the Student Life Office or the Fraternity and Sorority Involvement Center for ideas or to ask questions about developing meaningful programming for their members.

For additional information regarding hazing, please visit our Dean of Students website.

Remember that resources and policies exist to reinforce the importance of safety:

  • Call 911 – California’s 911 Good Samaritan Law provides limited protection from arrest, charge and prosecution for people who seek emergency medical assistance at the scene of a suspected drug overdose.
  • Take personal responsibility – Bystanders can protect lives. When you see something, take action.
  • Educate yourself and become involved in existing campus safety efforts.